A virtual hoard of the shiny things I find on the internet.

 

runonsentencesaboutemotions:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

Lion: AGGGGGGGHHHHH
YOU HAVE VANQUISHED ME, MIGHTY BEAST
Cub: DAD STOP
Lion: EVERYTHING…GOING…DARK
Cub: DAD OH MY GOD
Lion: REMEMBER WHO YOU ARE…

Parenting Done Right

runonsentencesaboutemotions:

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

Lion: AGGGGGGGHHHHH

YOU HAVE VANQUISHED ME, MIGHTY BEAST

Cub: DAD STOP

Lion: EVERYTHING…GOING…DARK

Cub: DAD OH MY GOD

Lion: REMEMBER WHO YOU ARE…

Parenting Done Right

(Source: lalulutres)

Anonymous asked
Towards the whole "pronouns hurt people's feelings" topic. Am I REALLY the only person on the planet that thinks people are becoming far to sensative? Nearly to the point that they shouldn't leave their little home bubbles in the case that a bird chirps next to them in a way that sounds like a mean word. Maybe, JUST MAYBE, we're becoming a little TOO coddling and people need to learn to deal with simplistic shit like words. And yes, I've been insulted and made fun of. I got over it. So can you.

thefrogman:

Supposedly invented by the Chinese, there is an ancient form of torture that is nothing more than cold, tiny drops falling upon a person’s forehead. 

On its own, a single drop is nothing. It falls upon the brow making a tiny splash. It doesn’t hurt. No real harm comes from it. 

In multitudes, the drops are still fairly harmless. Other than a damp forehead, there really is no cause for concern. 

The key to the torture is being restrained. You cannot move. You must feel each drop. You have lost all control over stopping these drops of water from splashing on your forehead. 

It still doesn’t seem like that big of a deal. But person after person, time and time again—would completely unravel psychologically. They all had a breaking point where each drop turned into a horror. Building and building until all sense of sanity was completely lost. 

"It was just a joke, quite being so sensitive."

"They used the wrong pronoun, big deal."

"So your parents don’t understand, it could be worse."

Day after day. Drop after drop. It builds up. A single instance on its own is no big deal. A few drops, not a problem. But when you are restrained, when you cannot escape the drops, when it is unending—these drops can be agony. 

People aren’t sensitive because they can’t take a joke. Because they can’t take being misgendered one time. Because they lack a thick skin. 

People are sensitive because the drops are unending and they have no escape from them. 

You are only seeing the tiny, harmless, single drop hitting these so-called “sensitive” people. You are failing to see the thousands of drops endured before that. You are failing to see the restraints that make them inescapable.

Happy birthday to our babby, Sir Charles Duckington!

tj:

Samesies.



I’m reading “Pastrix” right now and plotting how to attend her church without moving to Colorado.

tj:

Samesies.

I’m reading “Pastrix” right now and plotting how to attend her church without moving to Colorado.

When we talked, he focussed mostly on the design of the site, and I asked him whether he thought of Ello as a business at all. The answer was an emphatic but qualified “yes.” Budnitz said that he wants Ello to be sustainable, but that he sees no need for it to “become a billion-dollar company.” Because it’s relatively inexpensive to keep the basic infrastructure of a Web site running, he feels confident that he and his co-owners—the designers and programmers who helped build the site—can turn a decent profit by selling extra features for a dollar or two apiece.

Ello’s Anti-Facebook Moment - The New Yorker

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA

Imma assume this stupidity about this being “relatively inexpensive” comes from the artist who started Ello. This is why I can’t truly speak to non-technologists about technology at all. They have no fucking clue. To analogize this in a way that a visual artist would understand COMPLETELY…

"That painting is just drips and blocks of color. My kid could do that."

It’s not cheap to keep a website running, not if you want it to run reliably and at scale. And not one person is going to give dime one to a website that can’t run reliably and at scale.

Since Budnitz and his buddies put this together for a small group of people, it’ll have been designed from the ground up with the following design flaws (unless they have some seriously senior, seasoned, and incredibly smart engineers as friends which, I’m going to tell you right now they do not or one of them would already be the COO and the only person allowed to speak to the press).

  • No I18N/L10N support (that’s Internationalization and Localization for you non-techies and if you count letters you’ll understand why those are the abbreviations for those terms; you may also call me R5D).
  • Load balancing? What’s that?
  • Sharding? What’s that?
  • No API.
  • No sharable services.
  • The list goes on and on and on and on.

Anyone can hack together a small social networking website in a few, caffeine-fueled days. It’s a rare set of engineers who can build one for the masses. And that takes a lot of money. A LOT.

(via coyotesqrl)

Seconded. Remember back in the day (the Missing e day, that is), people were like “Jeremy, you should start your own social network, we’d jump on it” and I said something a lot more diplomatic than “you know what kind of shit that would take? Fuck that noise, I have a full-time job.”

Aaaaall of this.

There is absolutely, positively no reason why John Crawford shouldn’t be alive at this very moment. As hard as it is for some of you to hear this, I think we need to be honest about our problem: white America is often afraid of brown and black bodies. We’ve written into our laws that homicide is justifiable if one feels scared (as demonstrated by the lack of police accountability, stand your ground laws, etc). When we combine our fear of brown and black bodies with a legal system that often justifies violence if done to assuage the emotion of fear, it leaves us with a growing list of dead people and no accountability for those who took their lives.

A Book of Verses underneath the Bough,
A Jug of Wine, a Loaf of Bread—and Thou
Beside me singing in the Wilderness—
Oh, Wilderness were Paradise enow!

He said people who were right a lot of the time were people who often changed their minds. He doesn’t think consistency of thought is a particularly positive trait. It’s perfectly healthy — encouraged, even — to have an idea tomorrow that contradicted your idea today.