A virtual hoard of the shiny things I find on the internet.

 

Peanut Butter Monster

Charlie is at the stage where he knows the food we’re eating is often more interesting than what he eats. We feed him good stuff, but we have molars and he doesn’t, so… what we eat is usually more interesting.

I fed him a snack this afternoon- mixed veggies, some slices of string cheese, Cheerios, veggie straws. When he was finished eating, I plopped him down with some toys and went to make myself a peanut butter &apple butter sandwich. 

Charlie crawled into the kitchen to pull up on my leg. So I picked him up in one arm and grabbed my sandwich with my free hand to head to the living room.

Don’t you know that little stinker started grabbing at my sandwich. Well then, I guess this is the day we try peanut butter. 

We sat down, and he was so intent on grabbing my sandwich that I couldn’t situate myself to break off a piece for him. So Tom his holding the sandwich out so I can break off little pieces and hand them to him to try. 

I gave him a couple small bites to try and set him on the floor. Whereupon he immediately pulled up on my knees and started eyeing my sandwich again.

So I shared. I kept feeding him bites and he kept asking for more. It’s like having a dog. 

But inevitably, he got peanut butter all over his fingers, which means I now have peanut butter fingerprints all over me.

On passwords, hacking, and security

mikerastiello:

You’ve no doubt seen or heard about the latest hacking of the phones many celebrities. It’s a terrible thing and the sad thing is this will keep happening.

Take this time to make sure you have secure passwords. Passwords that you update often, and DO NOT use the same password on multiple sites.

Use a password management tool like 1Password and create as secure a password as you can on a website.

If  you use a website to share or store any sensitive information, photos, documents, whatever (and even if you don’t), use two-factor authentication (TFA). It’ll take a few minutes to set up and they have apps for your iPhone or Android phones.

Here’s a brief intro from Google on how two-factor authentication works.

It’s a ton of extra security for a few seconds of inconvenience as you authenticate yourself.

Some popular services that offer TFA:

A quick Google search of the service name and “two factor authentication” will quickly bring up any information or instructions that service has on setting up the extra security.

The most important account is your email as it is most likely the recovery email for every service you use. If a hacker can gain access to one, they can request a password reset on any other service and gain access to that account.

If you haven’t changed your password in a year or more, do it. With the recent news of Russian hackers gaining access to a billion passwords there is a good chance one of yours is in there.

This isn’t a 100% guarantee of safety and security, but it’s a big, big help.

Reblogged for great justice.

In the case of the stolen celebrity nude photos (do not even get me started), the current theory is that the email addresses were harvested from one address book, and then they were all phished, or matched with another dataset of stolen passwords somewhere.

So, obviously, be super-careful about typing in your password because an email told you to do it. Always check the URL of the page and make sure it’s absolutely correct. 

But also use two-factor authentication, because that gives you a layer of protection even IF your username and password are both compromised. Even for your online gaming profiles, if available. One of the early consumer uses of 2-factor was by Blizzard Entertainment- World of Warcraft accounts with well-geared characters were worth a LOT of money on eBay and used to get hacked a lot.

sausage problem

Tom: *returns from 13th St. Meats with 4 lb of sausage*

Tom: I may have a sausage problem.

Me: *stammers due to traffic jam of potential wisecracks in my brain*

Tom: I got 4 bratwursts, 4 half-smokes, and 8 roasted poblano.

Me: Yum!

Tom: The roasted poblano is SO GOOD. It's like a party in your face!

Me: Like a sausage party in your mouth?

Tom: ...

Tom: VERITABLY.

"You shall have camels, horses, an armed escort, provisions, desert vehicles… and tanks."

…said the federal government to local police departments.

"You shall have camels, horses, an armed escort, provisions, desert vehicles… and tanks."

…said the federal government to local police departments.

(Source: gifyoutube.com)

Why is it that people are willing to spend $20 on a bowl of pasta with sauce that they might actually be able to replicate pretty faithfully at home, yet they balk at the notion of a white-table cloth Thai restaurant, or a tacos that cost more than $3 each? Even in a city as “cosmopolitan” as New York, restaurant openings like Tamarind Tribeca (Indian) and Lotus of Siam (Thai) always seem to elicit this knee-jerk reaction from some diners who have decided that certain countries produce food that belongs in the “cheap eats” category—and it’s not allowed out. (Side note: How often do magazine lists of “cheap eats” double as rundowns of outer-borough ethnic foods?)

Yelp, Chowhound, and other restaurant sites are littered with comments like, “$5 for dumplings?? I’ll go to Flushing, thanks!” or “When I was backpacking in India this dish cost like five cents, only an idiot would pay that much!” Yet you never see complaints about the prices at Western restaurants framed in these terms, because it’s ingrained in people’s heads that these foods are somehow “worth” more. If we’re talking foie gras or chateaubriand, fair enough. But be real: You know damn well that rigatoni sorrentino is no more expensive to produce than a plate of duck laab, so to decry a pricey version as a ripoff is disingenuous. This question of perceived value is becoming increasingly troublesome as more non-native (read: white) chefs take on “ethnic” cuisines, and suddenly it’s okay to charge $14 for shu mai because hey, the chef is ELEVATING the cuisine.

betalars:

friend-zoning guys is horrible. it is disgusting. funzone them instead. send them to a small childs park so they can cry with the other babies when they dont get what they want.

(Source: plutoroyal)

Since we’ll be at altitude on vacation and I am a delicate flower, I bought this hat.I feel like Winona Ryder in Beetlejuice.

Since we’ll be at altitude on vacation and I am a delicate flower, I bought this hat.

I feel like Winona Ryder in Beetlejuice.

Charlie is eleven months old today!

He crawls! He cruises along the furniture! He has made friends with Macro (seriously… Macro comes over to nuzzle him even when he’s not hungry and accepts Charlie’s not-very-gentle pettings with purring). He waves hi and bye to people he’s close to, but is too fascinated by new people for social niceties.

He has learned to like watermelon, and to drink from a straw. After months of watching me reach up to steady myself on the car door as I lift him in and out, he reaches for it too.

He talks up a storm, and I might be imagining it, but it sounds like “ma-ma” and “da-da” are becoming just a little more deliberate…

jessicalprice:

wilwheaton:

konradwerks:

The situation is just intolerable. 
There have been a lot of really insightful write-ups recently. A broader perspective—and I almost cringe to say—catch-all by Molly Crabapple left me gasping for breath. This write up, by Elizabeth Sampat giving her thoughts on an industry that’s very dear to me, delivered the final blow and left me in tears.
It’s really rare that I create from a place of grief. It’s just not how I operate. But it’s largely what I have openly felt for the last few days, and reflecting on it, it’s been there for far longer.
This quote from Elizabeth’s piece— “We should have a war memorial for all of the women we have lost to this. We should lay flowers and grieve and see our reflections in stone.”— struck a very literal chord in me.
So yeah, here it is. A place just for me where I can light a candle and remember all of the wonderful people I probably will never get the chance to meet.  Folks that have been driven away by these horrible fucks that have the audacity to think they know what gaming and community is about.
en memoriam.

I have never, in my life, been ashamed to call myself a gamer. Until now. These misogynist little shitbags are a disgrace to our community.
All of us who care about gaming need to step up and save our community, while there is still something about it that’s worth saving.

Please do. Why are the men who want to drive women out of games so much louder than most of our male colleagues, our male gaming group members, our male friends, our male fans?
Your voices are louder than ours will ever be, at least in this arena; they won’t listen to us, because they think that listening to women proves they aren’t men. They’re trying to prove their manhood upon our work and our reputations and our wellbeing. Tell them that as a man, you’re not impressed.
They won’t listen to us, but they might listen to you. 
When’s the last time a female dev got an outpouring of support from men in the industry and in fandom when people first started harassing her (does it have to progress to the point where her children are being threatened at school, where she is driven from her home, before any sort of critical mass of men gets loud and says that this is not okay)? You don’t, incidentally, have to like her or her game to stand up and say that rape and death threats are not acceptable, that disagreement and legitimate criticism are not the same as harassment, that posting a dev’s home address or bank account numbers is something that has no legitimate place in discourse about games. When’s the last time men who love games and are in favor of working in games not being the most abuse-filled profession out there were half as loud as men who want to make it intolerable for women to make games?
I mean, imagine a world, just for a moment, in which when a female dev (or, for that matter, a male one) gets told by police that she probably shouldn’t spend the night at her home because of the threats she’s received from gamers, that gamers raise the money for her hotel room (or better, to hire some burly security people to spend the night watching her house so she doesn’t have to flee her home). In which a hundred people or so who spend all those hours righting injustices on their PCs and Playstations and Xboxes chip in $5 each to stop injustice against the kind of people who enabled them to enjoy all those hours of gaming in the first place.
Tell them, as they claim we aren’t real gamers, aren’t real geeks, got hired because we were female, must have slept with someone to get into the industry, aren’t real, aren’t legitimate, aren’t true, are ruining games with our presence, that our love for games, for geekdom, for fandom, is not in question.
Our right to be here is not in question. 
They have raised the price for women just to be here, just to do our jobs, just to play our games, just to wear our costumes, just to show up, so high it’s heartbreaking.
But women are still making games and we’re not going anywhere. Tell them that in raising the cost for women to remain, they haven’t made their targets less. They haven’t shown that women aren’t legitimate game makers, they haven’t shown that women aren’t real fans, they haven’t shown that women don’t belong here. 
All they’ve done is highlight women’s steel, women’s resilience, women’s determination. 
And that in and of itself is sad, that I haven’t met a female game industry veteran who isn’t battle-scarred and tougher than any ten guys I’ve worked with. This is supposed to be art. There’s supposed to be room for gentleness and delicacy and delight and nuance and vulnerability and all the other things that the strangling, one-note demands of man-child fans and the wretched hostility and cloying malice of interactions with them is crushing out of people who work in the industry. They’re the ones destroying games, not women. 
Fandom is supposed to be about loving a thing.
How can you love something when you want to destroy the people who made it? How can you love something when you want to chase away the people who also see how wonderful it is? What does all of this — driving Zoe and Anita out of their homes, sending rape and death threats to any female dev who dares express an opinion (or, for that matter, harassing women in comic book stores and game conventions) — have to do with being a fan?
Tell them, when they go after a female game dev who’s put in crazy hours and sacrificed her personal life and worked herself to the bone to bring them a game, that her love for games, her legitimacy as a gamer, her worth to games is not in question. 
Tell them theirs is. Tell them loudly. 

Make no mistake: an attack on any woman who dares to have an opinion in public- about games, about tech, about politics, about sports, about cars, about music, about movies, about comics, about our own damn bodies and what we do with them- is an attack on every single one of us.
This isn’t just about silencing Zoe Quinn and Anita Sarkeesian (though it is about that). It’s about silencing any woman who wants so much as to enjoy a thing men like, who wants to talk about it in public, who makes an argument that must be taken seriously. These attacks on specific women are warning shots to all women.
Gaming isn’t everybody’s thing (it’s only occasionally mine, in fact), but while only the gaming community can fix what is wrong with itself, everybody else needs to pay attention, because the misogyny, racism, bigotry, hypocrisy, and run-of-the-mill hatefulness on display right now exists in every fan subculture, and needs to be rooted out and thrown on the fire just as badly.
I don’t get the luxury of deciding that this isn’t my problem. You don’t either.

jessicalprice:

wilwheaton:

konradwerks:

The situation is just intolerable.

There have been a lot of really insightful write-ups recently. A broader perspective—and I almost cringe to say—catch-all by Molly Crabapple left me gasping for breath. This write up, by Elizabeth Sampat giving her thoughts on an industry that’s very dear to me, delivered the final blow and left me in tears.

It’s really rare that I create from a place of grief. It’s just not how I operate. But it’s largely what I have openly felt for the last few days, and reflecting on it, it’s been there for far longer.

This quote from Elizabeth’s piece— “We should have a war memorial for all of the women we have lost to this. We should lay flowers and grieve and see our reflections in stone.”— struck a very literal chord in me.

So yeah, here it is. A place just for me where I can light a candle and remember all of the wonderful people I probably will never get the chance to meet.  Folks that have been driven away by these horrible fucks that have the audacity to think they know what gaming and community is about.

en memoriam.

I have never, in my life, been ashamed to call myself a gamer. Until now. These misogynist little shitbags are a disgrace to our community.

All of us who care about gaming need to step up and save our community, while there is still something about it that’s worth saving.

Please do. Why are the men who want to drive women out of games so much louder than most of our male colleagues, our male gaming group members, our male friends, our male fans?

Your voices are louder than ours will ever be, at least in this arena; they won’t listen to us, because they think that listening to women proves they aren’t men. They’re trying to prove their manhood upon our work and our reputations and our wellbeing. Tell them that as a man, you’re not impressed.

They won’t listen to us, but they might listen to you. 

When’s the last time a female dev got an outpouring of support from men in the industry and in fandom when people first started harassing her (does it have to progress to the point where her children are being threatened at school, where she is driven from her home, before any sort of critical mass of men gets loud and says that this is not okay)? You don’t, incidentally, have to like her or her game to stand up and say that rape and death threats are not acceptable, that disagreement and legitimate criticism are not the same as harassment, that posting a dev’s home address or bank account numbers is something that has no legitimate place in discourse about games. When’s the last time men who love games and are in favor of working in games not being the most abuse-filled profession out there were half as loud as men who want to make it intolerable for women to make games?

I mean, imagine a world, just for a moment, in which when a female dev (or, for that matter, a male one) gets told by police that she probably shouldn’t spend the night at her home because of the threats she’s received from gamers, that gamers raise the money for her hotel room (or better, to hire some burly security people to spend the night watching her house so she doesn’t have to flee her home). In which a hundred people or so who spend all those hours righting injustices on their PCs and Playstations and Xboxes chip in $5 each to stop injustice against the kind of people who enabled them to enjoy all those hours of gaming in the first place.

Tell them, as they claim we aren’t real gamers, aren’t real geeks, got hired because we were female, must have slept with someone to get into the industry, aren’t real, aren’t legitimate, aren’t true, are ruining games with our presence, that our love for games, for geekdom, for fandom, is not in question.

Our right to be here is not in question. 

They have raised the price for women just to be here, just to do our jobs, just to play our games, just to wear our costumes, just to show up, so high it’s heartbreaking.

But women are still making games and we’re not going anywhere. Tell them that in raising the cost for women to remain, they haven’t made their targets less. They haven’t shown that women aren’t legitimate game makers, they haven’t shown that women aren’t real fans, they haven’t shown that women don’t belong here. 

All they’ve done is highlight women’s steel, women’s resilience, women’s determination. 

And that in and of itself is sad, that I haven’t met a female game industry veteran who isn’t battle-scarred and tougher than any ten guys I’ve worked with. This is supposed to be art. There’s supposed to be room for gentleness and delicacy and delight and nuance and vulnerability and all the other things that the strangling, one-note demands of man-child fans and the wretched hostility and cloying malice of interactions with them is crushing out of people who work in the industry. They’re the ones destroying games, not women. 

Fandom is supposed to be about loving a thing.

How can you love something when you want to destroy the people who made it? How can you love something when you want to chase away the people who also see how wonderful it is? What does all of this — driving Zoe and Anita out of their homes, sending rape and death threats to any female dev who dares express an opinion (or, for that matter, harassing women in comic book stores and game conventions) — have to do with being a fan?

Tell them, when they go after a female game dev who’s put in crazy hours and sacrificed her personal life and worked herself to the bone to bring them a game, that her love for games, her legitimacy as a gamer, her worth to games is not in question. 

Tell them theirs is. Tell them loudly. 

Make no mistake: an attack on any woman who dares to have an opinion in public- about games, about tech, about politics, about sports, about cars, about music, about movies, about comics, about our own damn bodies and what we do with them- is an attack on every single one of us.

This isn’t just about silencing Zoe Quinn and Anita Sarkeesian (though it is about that). It’s about silencing any woman who wants so much as to enjoy a thing men like, who wants to talk about it in public, who makes an argument that must be taken seriously. These attacks on specific women are warning shots to all women.

Gaming isn’t everybody’s thing (it’s only occasionally mine, in fact), but while only the gaming community can fix what is wrong with itself, everybody else needs to pay attention, because the misogyny, racism, bigotry, hypocrisy, and run-of-the-mill hatefulness on display right now exists in every fan subculture, and needs to be rooted out and thrown on the fire just as badly.

I don’t get the luxury of deciding that this isn’t my problem. You don’t either.

wailtothethief:

Fuck I’m walking downtown and I pass a group of guys staring at me and I think “great catcall time” but then one guy goes “you look like you could kill a man a million different ways with just your bare hands”. This. This is an acceptable comment to give a girl on the street.